Spinach, Bloomsdale

Dark green leaves are more savoyed than Giant Winter.  Selected for early spring and fall crops as it has good cold soil emergence but a tendency to bolt in the heat.  Performs well as a winter greenhouse crop or overwinter outdoors under mulch.  David Landreth developed the original Bloomsdale spinach in the 1800s.  (Spinacia oleracea)

Spinach, Bloomsdale Plant Info

  • PLANT TYPE: Annual
  • SCIENTIFIC NAME: Spinacia oleracea
  • LIGHT: Full Sun
  • SOIL TYPE: Well-drained, high organic matter
  • pH RANGE: 6.5 – 7.5
  • MOISTURE/WATERING: Even moisture, not waterlogged
  • MATURITY IN DAYS: 40 – 50
  • KNOWN PESTS: Leaf Miner
  • KNOWN DISEASES: N/A

OVERVIEW:

Spinach is mainly an early-spring and late-fall crop, but in some areas, where summer temperatures are mild, it may be grown continuously from early spring until late fall where tempatures changes are not severe.

Spinach will grow on almost any well-drained, fertile soil where sufficient moisture is available.  Spinach is very sensitive to acid soil.  If a soil test shows the need, apply lime to the part of the garden used for spinach, regardless of the treatment given the rest of the area.  Use thinned spinach plants in salad – they are very nutritious and taste great!

PROPAGATION / SOWING OF SPINACH:

Spinach thrives in cool weather, so plant as soon as the soil can be worked or when soil temperatures are between 10-24°C.  For a fall crop, plant spinach again in late August or early September.  Sow spinach thinly, about ½” deep.  Thin to 1-3” apart in rows 12” apart.

COMPANION PLANTING OF SPINACH:

Spinach does well with bush beans, cabbage family, celery, lettuce, onion, pea.

CARE & GROWING OF SPINACH:

Spinach prefer full sun to partial shade with a soil pH of 6.5-7.5.  Spinach are moderate feeders require a fertile, well cultivated soil.  Enrich soil with plenty of compost and some partially rotted manure or fertilizer high in nitrogen.  Spinach needs even moisture for good growth.  Drought and warm temperatures will cause premature bolting in spinach.

HARVESTING SPINACH:

Cut spinach as soon as leaves are big enough to eat.  If spinach is looking old and tired, cut the entire plant back to 1” tall to stimulate young, tasty growth.  If spinach showing signs of bolting, harvest the whole crop – it freezes well.

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