Okra, Clemson Spineless

Okra is a traditional Southern favorite for gumbo, stews, and, of course, fried okra.  More and more Northern gardeners are realizing their love for okra, too.  An All America Selections winner from 1939, this Clemson Spineless green okra produces high yields of spineless, tender, ribbed pods with excellent flavor.  Harvest pods when 3 inches long for the most tender, flavorful okra.

Okra, Clemson Spineless Plant Info

  • PLANT TYPE: Annual
  • SCIENTIFIC NAME: Hibiscus esculentus
  • LIGHT: Full Sun
  • SOIL TYPE: Rich, well-drained, with organic matter
  • pH RANGE: 6.0 – 6.8
  • MOISTURE/WATERING: Average
  • MATURITY IN DAYS: 50 – 55
  • KNOWN PESTS: N/A
  • KNOWN DISEASES: N/A

OVERVIEW:

Okra should be sown late in the spring or early summer when the ground is warm.  Okra should then be thinned so the plants are spaced 12 to 18 inches apart.  Okra is a tall and attractive plant, okra grows very quickly and should be harvested frequently while it is still tender.  Harvesting every few days will prevent toughness.  Okra is great vegetable fried, or in stews and gumbos.

PROPAGATION / SOWING OF OKRA:

Soak okra seeds in warm water for twenty-four hours before planting and keep the soil temperature at 24ºC (75°F)or above.  Soil should be fertile and high in potash with a pH of 6.0-6.8.  Sow okra ¼” deep in flats 7-8 weeks before transplanting.  Germination may take up to two weeks.

CARE & GROWING OF OKRA:

Transplant okra in a sunny location after last frost.  Space 1-2’ apart in rows 2’ apart.  row covers or plastic mulch will encourage early pod set.  Okra is a tropical plant therefore requiring warm weather conditions.  Keep moist and and fertilize well.

HARVESTING OKRA:

For most tender and flavourful quality, harvest okra when pods are 3-4” long and cook as soon as possible.  Pick okra on a weekly basis to encourage continual fruit set.

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