Mustard, Tendergreen

Also known as “Spinach Mustard”, “Tendergreen” is an heirloom mustard with a mild flavor that can be used just like spinach.   Heat and drought resistant, “Tendergreen Mustard” seeds can be planted virtually in any zones.

Mustard, Tendergreen Plant Info

  • PLANT TYPE: Annual
  • SCIENTIFIC NAME:
  • LIGHT: Sun
  • SOIL TYPE:  Fertile, Organic, Well-drained Sandy Loam
  • pH RANGE:  6.5
  • MOISTURE/WATERING: Keep well watered
  • MATURITY IN DAYS:  45
  • KNOWN PESTS:  Aphids, Leafminers, Flea Beatle, Beet Armyworm
  • KNOWN DISEASES:  Powdery Mildew, Mosaic, Black Rot

OVERVIEW:

Growing mustards is something that may be unfamiliar to many gardeners, but this spicy green is quick and easy to grow. This nutritious cool weather crop shares cultural requirements with members of the cabbage family.  Planting mustard greens in your garden will help you add a healthy and tasty food to your vegetable garden harvest

PROPAGATION / SOWING OF MUSTARD GREENS:

Direct sow ¼ in. deep in spring, summer, and early fall. Thin to 8–12 in. apart in rows 10–12 in. apart. Keep well watered.  Sow at 2 week intervals for continued harvest.    Keep soil moderately moist during germination.

COMPANION PLANTING OF MUSTARD GREENS:

If you want to grow mustard to use the greens or for the seeds, grow it alongside plants that act as an insect trap or repel harmful insects.  Good companion plants for mustard include nasturtium, onions, garlic, dill and borage.  These plants also work as companion plants for cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and other vegetables in the Mustard family

CARE & GROWING OF MUSTARD GREENS:

Plant mustard greens in early spring after the danger of frost has passed. Successive crops can be planted every three weeks to allow for a continuous crop during summer.  They can again be planted in early fall before the first killing frost.  There is no real need to thin the plants as you can start to harvest leaves as soon as they are large enough to use.

Mustard often bolts (goes to seed) during the hottest part of summer.  To prevent bolting, use row covers to protect the plants from the more intense rays of sunlight.  If you choose to allow your crop to go to seed, the seeds can be ground then strained and made into homemade mustard for use as a condiment.

HARVESTING OF MUSTARD GREENS:

Harvest mustard greens continuously throughout the season by clipping a few leaves as needed and leaving the rest of the plant in the ground.  Choose leaves that are 3-4 inches in length for best flavor.  Avoid any leaves that look yellowed or unhealthy.  Use scissors or a knife rather than pulling the leaves to avoid damaging the plant.  Store unwashed mustard greens in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator for about three days after harvesting.  Pull and compost the plants once hot weather arrives in the summer, as mustard greens become tough and bitter.

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